Revise 2018

“THE MAKING OF A STORY” by Alice LaPlante

A decent guide to the kinds of things a writer needs to know: planning, POV, plot, scene, dialogue, theme, etc. Tries to touch on more than one genre. Contains some interesting exercises that could be useful. Incorporates advice on revision and examples of polished work.

 

 THE SUBVERSIVE COPY EDITOR by Carol Fisher Saller

Practical answers to writers’ questions about style. Saller highlights the importance of adapting to changes in grammar rules to reflect current speech and technology. She tries to prove that copyediting isn’t as black/white as the publishing world believes it to be.

 

A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS by M. H. Abrams

A dictionary of literary terms helpful for writers whose work is missing something and they’re not quite sure what. Abrams gives long, involved explanations about the literary history of words such as “absurd” and what they mean in different contexts. Because you can’t use an allusion if you don’t know what it is.

THE ART OF DRAMATIC WRITING by Lajos Egri

Whether or not you write plays, it’s important to study plays if you write. Theatre writing is powerful and can even teach a novelist about exceptional dialogue, masterful scenes and hidden motivations. Egri focuses on premise and character in his work.

 

TO TELL THE TRUTH by Connie D. Griffin

A text exploring contemporary theories about creative non-fiction, including memoir, biography, literary journalism, personal essays, etc. Offers writers practical advice on how to build a writing practice. Incorporates chapters on how to plan, write, develop and revise creative non-fiction pieces.

 MANILA NOIR edited by Jessica Hagedorn

All participants in Typefaces will get a “course pack” of selected short stories for study, but we’re not trying to duplicate what happens in creative writing courses. We want to study the kinds of stories that don’t get studied in MFA programs. MANILA NOIR is one example of the kinds of anthologies of short fiction we’re interested in: stories that reflect diverse experiences and don’t fit into the mainstream.

“THE MAKING OF A STORY” by Alice LaPlante

A decent guide to the kinds of things a writer needs to know: planning, POV, plot, scene, dialogue, theme, etc. Tries to touch on more than one genre. Contains some interesting exercises that could be useful. Incorporates advice on revision and examples of polished work.

THE SUBVERSIVE COPY EDITOR by Carol Fisher Saller

Practical answers to writers’ questions about style. Saller highlights the importance of adapting to changes in grammar rules to reflect current speech and technology. She tries to prove that copyediting isn’t as black/white as the publishing world believes it to be.

A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS by M. H. Abrams

A dictionary of literary terms helpful for writers whose work is missing something and they’re not quite sure what. Abrams gives long, involved explanations about the literary history of words such as “absurd” and what they mean in different contexts. Because you can’t use an allusion if you don’t know what it is.

THE ART OF DRAMATIC WRITING by Lajos Egri

Whether or not you write plays, it’s important to study plays if you write. Theatre writing is powerful and can even teach a novelist about exceptional dialogue, masterful scenes and hidden motivations. Egri focuses on premise and character in his work.

TO TELL THE TRUTH by Connie D. Griffin

A text exploring contemporary theories about creative non-fiction, including memoir, biography, literary journalism, personal essays, etc. Offers writers practical advice on how to build a writing practice. Incorporates chapters on how to plan, write, develop and revise creative non-fiction pieces.

MANILA NOIR edited by Jessica Hagedorn

All participants in Typefaces will get a “course pack” of selected short stories for study, but we’re not trying to duplicate what happens in creative writing courses. We want to study the kinds of stories that don’t get studied in MFA programs. MANILA NOIR is one example of the kinds of anthologies of short fiction we’re interested in: stories that reflect diverse experiences and don’t fit into the mainstream.

“THE MAKING OF A STORY” by Alice LaPlante

A decent guide to the kinds of things a writer needs to know: planning, POV, plot, scene, dialogue, theme, etc. Tries to touch on more than one genre. Contains some interesting exercises that could be useful. Incorporates advice on revision and examples of polished work.

 

THE SUBVERSIVE COPY EDITOR by Carol Fisher Saller

Practical answers to writers’ questions about style. Saller highlights the importance of adapting to changes in grammar rules to reflect current speech and technology. She tries to prove that copyediting isn’t as black/white as the publishing world believes it to be.

 

A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS by M. H. Abrams

A dictionary of literary terms helpful for writers whose work is missing something and they’re not quite sure what. Abrams gives long, involved explanations about the literary history of words such as “absurd” and what they mean in different contexts. Because you can’t use an allusion if you don’t know what it is.

 

THE ART OF DRAMATIC WRITING by Lajos Egri

Whether or not you write plays, it’s important to study plays if you write. Theatre writing is powerful and can even teach a novelist about exceptional dialogue, masterful scenes and hidden motivations. Egri focuses on premise and character in his work.

 

TO TELL THE TRUTH by Connie D. Griffin

A text exploring contemporary theories about creative non-fiction, including memoir, biography, literary journalism, personal essays, etc. Offers writers practical advice on how to build a writing practice. Incorporates chapters on how to plan, write, develop and revise creative non-fiction.

 

MANILA NOIR edited by Jessica Hagedorn

All participants in Typefaces will get a “course pack” of short stories for study, but we’re not trying to duplicate what happens in creative writing courses. We want to study the kinds of stories that don’t get studied in MFA programs. MANILA NOIR is one example of the kinds of anthologies of short fiction we’re interested in: stories that reflect diverse experiences and don’t fit into the mainstream.